Archive for September, 2014

Ruckus Wireless Awards Alpha Dog Status to Net-Ctrl

Thursday, September 25th, 2014

Over the Summer Net-Ctrl achieved the top partner status with Ruckus Wireless, we’re now classed as an ‘Alpha Dog’ partner. This is a level that only a few companies in the UK have achieved.

To be classed as an ‘Alpha Dog’ partner we were required to complete various sales and technical exams, and demonstrate our competence with the Ruckus solution and knowledge of the wireless environment.

What this means to our customers and clients is that we should be able to offer a better price than other non-alpha dog partners, and it should also provide you with the security in knowing that you’re dealing with a trusted Ruckus reseller.

Find out more about the Ruckus product line by visiting our main Ruckus product page, if you’re looking at investing in a new wireless deployment, then first step is to speak to us about a wireless site survey.

alphadog_dogtag_with_ruckus_logo

Competitive Evaluation of Three-Stream 802.11n Access Points by Syracuse University

Tuesday, September 23rd, 2014

In many enterprises, wired connectivity is no longer the default— or even the primary— mode of network access. With the escalating number of wireless devices and the accompanying demand for increased bandwidth, Wi-Fi-serving enterprises must ensure that end-users have a consistent experience. The state of the art in Wi-Fi technology is dual-band, three-stream 802.11n access points, devices which are marketed by their vendors with exceptionally high data rates. These metrics, while not altogether untrue, account only for maximum physical layer data rates; achievable application layer throughput is typically lower and often more than halved, even under optimal conditions. Throughput is hampered not only by layer 2 retransmissions and dozens of clients, but by the vast amount of overhead associated with 802.11 protocols.

The Centre for Convergence and Emerging Networking Technologies, housed in the School of Information Studies at Syracuse University, partnered with Ruckus Wireless to determine the level of throughput network administrators could expect from five leading vendor’s indoor three stream access points in an environment that resembles real-world deployments. Our tests are an attempt to discover what the top aggregate throughput for each vendor’s access point might be, as well as how each product scales under the load of many clients and an increasingly difficult RF environment. Vendors included Aerohive Networks, Aruba Networks, Cisco Systems, Meraki, and Ruckus Wireless. We performed a battery of tests in three broad categories:

  • Single AP, single client (rate v. range)
  • Multiple classrooms of simultaneous users (90) on a single AP
  • Multiple classrooms of simultaneous users (120) using multiple APs (6)

To be clear, our evaluation of vendors’ products was not a comprehensive product review. We did not compare total cost of ownership, ease of management, or advanced features and functionality, all of which may be more important than raw throughput in some environments. In addition, since our primary interest involved the assessment of maximum system throughput, we conducted all our testing with three-stream client devices. While we made a diligent effort to optimize each product for maximum performance, we do not disclaim the possibility that each vendor’s product could have been configured in a more optimal manner. New software releases might also result in better performance.

While all of the products we tested provided throughput levels that will meet the needs of most organizations, we found significant variation in their performances. Our results suggest that Ruckus Wireless’ ZoneFlex 7982 offers the best overall performance of any of the products we tested. In addition, we found Ruckus performance to be significantly more consistent as we altered key elements of the physical environment.

Read the full report by the Centre for Convergence and Emerging Networking Technologies, housed in the School of Information Studies at Syracuse University

This is an extract from the full report.

Ruckus BeamFlex Explained

Thursday, September 18th, 2014

Unsure on the differences between ‘Transmit Beamforming’ and Ruckus’ patented ‘BeamFlex’ technology?

Watch this short video from Ruckus that will briefly explain how and why the Ruckus BeamFlex technology works and how it improves range, reliability and performance of WiFi networks and services.

Back to School Wireless Promotion

Tuesday, September 16th, 2014
Faster, more dependable Wi-Fi connectivity that’s affordable is fundamental for schools, colleges, academies and universities.

Wireless in education has a demanding list of requirements. It must cover large school grounds, yet reach every corner of a classroom. It must support multimedia applications while providing secure connectivity for staff, students, and guests.

Limited budgets and IT staff add further strain to the equation. Ruckus smart Wi-Fi could be just what you need.

Ruckus Wireless and Net-Ctrl are running a special promotion exclusively for education that will save your school money, whilst still providing you with an award winning enterprise grade wireless solution.

We will work with you to build a solution that it purposefully designed for your site and your wireless ambitions.

We can combine any number of access points, including the 11ac R700 unit. This offer will expire on the 30th September.

If you’re unsure on the number of access points your site needs to achieve site wide smart WiFi and have some accurate site plans available, send them to sales@net-ctrl.com for a free predictive site survey. We will be able to provide you with predictive heat maps, AP counts, signal strength, signal coverage and more. Find out about our wireless site surveys.

 

Why You Should Choose Net-Ctrl

Net-Ctrl have installed Ruckus into over 400 education sites around the UK, many of which we provide an on-going wireless support service to. We have worked hard at achieving the top level partner status within Ruckus, which means we can offer you the best possible price, and you have the confidence in knowing that you’re buying from a fully trained and certified Ruckus Wireless partner

 

Ruckus Wireless Reaches New Heights with Wi-Fi Tech

Thursday, September 11th, 2014

This is an edited article taken from Nasdaq – click for original article.

Wi-Fi is a great thing as long as you have immediate and easy access to the signal and don’t find yourself chasing it around the room just to stay connected.

The problem is many Wi-Fi signals are weak. They can get blocked or redirected, or they lack the capacity to support multiple devices.

Ruckus’ technology addresses Wi-Fi capacity and coverage problems caused by the ever-increasing amount of traffic and noise or interference on wireless networks, mainly due to a rise in the use of smartphones and tablets.

Smartphone Connection

Its gear is in high demand amid a corresponding boom in demand for more and better Wi-Fi technology.

“Because of the smartphone phenomenon, data capacity keeps expanding, and Wi-Fi has become the de facto way users want to connect,” said David Callisch, Ruckus’ vice president of corporate marketing. “Our innovations transform Wi-Fi into more of a wire like experience in terms of reliability.”

It does so by providing a stronger, more direct signal for users, Callisch told IBD. That’s important because so many different factors can disrupt a signal.

“If you are in a warehouse, for example, every time something changes or moves, the Wi-Fi environment changes,” Callisch said. “If you have 50 different access points, you can’t go changing all the antennas at once.”

Ruckus‘ technology creates a “dynamic” antenna that moves the Wi-Fi signal around the same way a lighthouse moves its beam, he says. “Because it is focused, the signal is inherently stronger, so users get higher data rates.”

Many of Ruckus’ customers are small and midsize enterprises that want to deliver better Wi-Fi services to staff and customers.

“Their antenna technology is far superior because it works in high-density environments like hotels and factories. Factories have a lot of cement, and hotels have a lot of walls, and you need a strong signal for Wi-Fi to work effectively,” said Catharine Trebnick, analyst at Dougherty, an investment bank and brokerage firm.

Ruckus’ customers also include service providers, such as telecoms and cable companies, that want to gain more business by providing better Wi-Fi services to customers.

“Cable operators are using our Wi-Fi technology to enable them to reduce churn with subscribers,” Seamus Hennessy, Ruckus’ chief financial officer, told IBD. “Ruckus is benefiting because our core technology lets the network operate almost like a utility.”

Apple Watch, Google Fiber

Ruckus is expected to land more business as new products such as smartwatches grow in popularity.

“Apple ( AAPL ) and Samsung have launched mobile watches, and that’s going to require even more Wi-Fi,” analyst Trebnick told IBD. “Wi-Fi is becoming ubiquitous, so that’s the driver that’s not going to ever go away.”

She says Ruckus also stands to benefit from Google ‘s (GOOGL) fiber-optics network, which got started around Kansas City, Kan., and has expanded into Provo, Utah, and Austin, Texas. Google is expected to roll out the Google Fiber fast-broadband service into more than 30 U.S. cities as well as other countries.

Among the customers that Google wants to target with the network are small to midsize businesses, Trebnick says.

“It hasn’t been confirmed, but everybody believes Ruckus will be one of the primary suppliers of Wi-Fi when Google does this,” she said.

Ruckus executives wouldn’t comment on the Google Fiber rumours.

For now, the company has plenty of business to keep it occupied. Ruckus was founded in 2004 and had its initial public offering in November 2012. It has been profitable since 2009 and expects to keep growing those profits in coming quarters and years.

“We’ve made significant investments in R&D over last few years, and we’re now at a position where revenue is growing faster than R&D spending,” Hennessy said. “We have also achieved operating efficiencies that led to higher gross margins.”

“We are in a significant growth cycle for Wi-Fi over the next couple of years because of the proliferation of devices,” Hennessy said. “We feel we are in a good position to take advantage of that because of our technology.”

 

Two Men, a Two Kilometre P2P Link and Some Ruckus Wireless Access Points

Thursday, September 11th, 2014
Some of the Net-Ctrl team take wireless outdoors with the Ruckus Wireless 7731 Point-to-Point ZoneFlex access points to achieve a two kilometre connection over some tricky terrain.

Last week one of our senior wireless engineers and an account manager visited a customer site to test a planned point-to-point (PTP) link. They were using the Ruckus Wireless 7731 access points for a two kilometre link. The 7731 outdoor access point utilises a patented dual-polarised directional smart antenna system that is capable of supporting a maximum fifteen kilometre link. In theory, the posed two kilometre link shouldn’t be a problem.

Before visiting the site our engineer had performed some predictive tests, which all came back suggesting a good link was achievable over the area in question. All good so far. However, as everyone in wireless knows, wireless and RF is an unpredictable beast, which is why performing live tests and surveys for any proposed wireless project is a MUST.

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Outdoor P2P Mast

Our team turned up with two of the 7731 access points and two seventeen metre telescopic masts in order to achieve the required height. These particular masts are a valuable bit of kit in the wireless engineer tool box, especially as they compact down to less than two metres.

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Ruckus 7731 on our Mast

Each mast was placed at ground level, where the final access point would be installed. Due to a few limitation and aesthetic requirements our team was very limited to the locations where we could mount the Non-Root node on the building. This would limit the chances for a successful connection if the only available location failed due to obstructions further down the link.

Despite our teams best efforts the link did not work due to a plot of very high trees intruding too much on the Fresnel Zone. To try and combat this, we tried the 10 degree beam width antennas in an attempt to reduce the Fresnel Zone created by the link, unfortunately it still failed.

This is a great example of the importance of performing on-site PTP link tests. The planning tools suggested it should work and to the eye it looked good, but with wireless you never know until you test and test again.

The good news is we are working closely with the customer and their restraints on a way around the obstruction.

The next action is to “dog leg” the link by finding a common vantage point for both ends to achieve a clear line of site.

Watch this space.